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Public Sector Workgroup

 

Chair: Deborah Garnick, Sc. D. Dr. Garnick is a Professor in the Institute for Behavioral Health at The Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University and Associate Dean, Academic Personnel. She received her doctorate in health services research from the School of Hygiene and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University (now the Bloomberg School of Public Health). During the first ten years of her career, when Dr. Garnick’s research was focused on the quality of hospital services, she explored the issues of hospital market areas, patients’ decisions to select hospitals based on quality, and hospital outcomes. With colleagues at the University of California, she focused on the relationship of hospital volume and patient outcomes, then a newly emerging area of research. Currently, Dr. Garnick leads the Brandeis team in a collaboration with RTI focused on technical development of the National Outcome Measures (NOMS) for behavioral health in a project funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). She has led NIH-funded studies focused on exploring the association between substance performance measures and outcomes. She serves as is the Co-Principal Investigator on studies that involve tracking of drug and alcohol abuse services and mental health services provided by the managed behavioral health care industry. In addition, she is a member of the Washington Circle Policy Group and leads their workgroup on public sector performance measures for substance abuse. Dr. Garnick often serves as an expert consultant, most recently as a member of the National Quality Forum’s Substance Use Disorders and Evidence Based-Practices Technical Advisory Panel. Dr. Garnick has published widely on the topics of injuries among Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, state-level health insurance reform legislation, quality of hospital and ambulatory care, methods of using data collected for administrative purposes for health services research, and performance measures for substance abuse.
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Doreen Cavanaugh, Ph.D. is a Research Associate Professor at the Health Policy Institute, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Georgetown University where she is responsible for conducting a program of research and policy analysis in the areas of child and adolescent mental health and substance abuse treatment. She is a Senior Advisor to the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, (SAMHSA) on adolescent issues addressing the financing and organization of adolescent substance abuse treatment services as well as services for youth with co-occurring disorders. Dr. Cavanaugh is the National Program Director of a 16 state CSAT grant initiative to improve the state infrastructure supporting delivery of treatment for adolescents with substance use and co-occurring disorders. She served as Chairperson of the Financing Workgroup for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Summit on Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and works on issues including financing treatment and program sustainability. She has completed an extensive analysis of federal policies affecting the delivery of treatment services for adolescents with substance use disorders, and has consulted on the organization and financing of child and adolescent treatment services for states, foundations and national organizations.  Dr. Cavanaugh is Co-chair of a CSAT sponsored committee developing a consumer perception of care survey for adolescents and adults receiving substance abuse treatment. She was the Co-chair of a joint CSAT/CMHS Child/Adolescent Modular Survey Committee and chaired the Washington Circle Subcommittee on Performance Measurement for Care of Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders, a Center for Substance Abuse Treatment supported national group of adolescent substance abuse treatment experts charged with assessing the applicability of the Washington Circle administrative measures to adolescent substance abuse treatment. She serves on a number of related committees including the CMHS sponsored Outcomes Roundtable for Children and Families. Currently Dr. Cavanaugh teaches Mental Health Policy at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. She taught both Child Welfare Policy and Mental Health Policy at the Boston University School of Social Work for many years.  Dr. Cavanaugh received her Ph.D. in Social Policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University.
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Mady Chalk, Ph.D. is the Director of the Center for Performance-Based Policy at the Treatment Research Institute (TRI) where she directs collaborations between and among researchers, state and local policy makers, purchasers, elected officials, and treatment providers to develop policy-based strategies for improving delivery of addiction treatment.  Prior to joining TRI, for many years Dr. Chalk was Director of the Division of Services Improvement in the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT)/Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Dr. Chalk provided federal leadership for the discretionary grant program at CSAT and for its quality improvement programs, including the Washington Circle Group.  On behalf of CSAT she participated in NiaTx, implementation of the Center’s science-to-service/best practices agenda, its organization and financing studies, and workforce development activities. Dr. Chalk provided leadership for a number of innovative new State-wide programs related to increasing access to alcohol and drug treatment, including a program in general medical settings that provides screening, brief interventions, and referrals to treatment.  Before joining the federal government, Dr. Chalk was Senior Program Officer at the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in Health and Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University.  For 15 years before coming to the Washington area, Dr. Chalk was a faculty member in the Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, and the Director of the Outpatient /Community Services Division of Yale Psychiatric Institute.
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Steven Davis, Ph.D. is the Chief Information Officer at the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.  He is past chair of the Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) Policy Group and is a member of the CSAT-sponsored Behavioral Health Treatment Standards Workgroup, Washington Circle Public Sector Performance Measures Workgroup, NASADAD-sponsored Performance Data Workgroup, and the Confidentiality, Privacy and Security Workgroup of the American Health Information Community, an initiative of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.
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Jay Ford, Ph.D. is the Chief Research Officer for NIATx and in this role, oversees the research activities including data collection across all of NIATx initiatives.. He also directs the CSAT-funded STAR–SI program, which focuses looks at how state and provider partnerships can implement and spread process improvement techniques to improve client access to and retention in treatment. Jay is a co-investigator for a five-year National Institute of Drug Abuse grant that will study the cost effectiveness and impact of how various NIATx components influence access and retention. He also serves as the co-primary investigator for a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant that will utilize process mapping to examine the flow of information through treatment agencies. Ford also serves as a process improvement coach for selected NIATx members, serves as faculty at Learning Sessions and manages the NIATx Web site. Ford has also worked for the Baptist Memorial Healthcare System in Memphis, TN, where he implemented organizational and operational change initiatives. to improve patient delivery and staff workflow. He also has extensive experience managing data systems across multiple healthcare organizations and evaluating long-term planning initiatives. Trained as a health systems engineer, Ford received his Ph.D. in Health Systems Engineering from the UW–Madison, where his dissertation focused on employee commitment to organizational change. He is a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives, and a Fellow of the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society.
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Constance M. Horgan, Sc.D. (Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University), is a Professor at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University and the founding Director of its Institute for Behavioral Health, which focuses on the intersection of health, behavior and systems of care.  Dr. Horgan has focused her research on studying how behavioral health services are financed, organized, and delivered in the public and private sectors and what approaches can be used to improve the quality and effectiveness of the delivery system.  She has over twenty-five years of experience in health policy analysis and services research in both academic and government settings.  She has been involved with numerous national studies involving health surveys of both individuals and organizations, as well as extensive use of administrative data.   She currently directs the Brandeis/Harvard Center on Managed Care funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and leads several other studies related to the delivery of alcohol, drug and mental health services.   She also directs a National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) doctoral training program in health services research and teaches courses in behavioral health and substance abuse policy.   She has led studies for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), NIDA, NIAAA, and foundations, including Robert Wood Johnson.   Dr. Horgan has written numerous articles and served on expert panels and advisory committees for federal agencies, professional associations, and academic and community task forces.
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Jack Kemp, MS is the Director of Substance Abuse Services for the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH), the Single State AOD Agency (SSA) for the State of Delaware.  In this position, Mr. Kemp is responsible for the management and administration of a statewide system of publicly funded alcohol and drug abuse prevention, early intervention and treatment programs.  Kemp has over 34 years of experience in the field of addictions, mainly in senior management positions with the SSA’s in Delaware and New York.  In addition to his current position in Delaware, he served as the Director of the Treatment Access Center (TASC), overseeing a statewide program that provided liaison between the substance abuse treatment and criminal justice systems. In New York, Mr. Kemp held a variety of management positions with the Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS).  In his current position in Delaware, Mr. Kemp redesigned and restructured the statewide substance abuse treatment system, and introduced a performance based contracting model that connects payment to performance.  He served as Executive Leader for the Robert Wood Johnson/CSAT Network for the Improvement of Treatment (NIATx) State Pilot in Delaware to improve access and retention in treatment throughout the state and for the RWJF Advancing Recovery grant to implement evidence based practices.  Mr. Kemp also is the Principal Investigator, in collaboration with the Treatment Research Institute, for a NIDA grant on Statewide Science-Based Concurrent Recovery Monitoring in Delaware.  Mr. Kemp is a Board member of the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors (NASADAD).  He also is a member of the Washington Circle Policy and Public Sector committees.   Mr. Kemp’s educational background includes an M.S. degree in Educational Counseling from the University of Scranton, and post-graduate training at the Alfred Adler Institute of Psychoanalysis in New York City.  He is currently matriculated in the MALS (Master of Arts in Liberal Studies) graduate program at the University of Delaware.
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Tracy Leeper, MA has worked for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) for the last fifteen years in the Decision Support Services Division, conducting data analysis, performance monitoring and program evaluation.  She has served as coordinator of all of the Department’s data system and performance indicator grant projects for the last seven years.  She is a member of the Governing Board’s Performance Improvement Committee, serves as the chair for a cross-system data collection and outcomes workgroup involving eight state agencies, and serves as the Chair for the Southern States Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program User Group.
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Frank McCorry is the Director of the New York City Office of the Commissioner for the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. He is responsible for clinical policy and practice improvement issues, particularly in the areas of public health, co-occurring mental health and addictive disorders and managed care. He represents OASAS on a joint initiative with the Office of Mental Health on co-occurring disorders, which is based on the “New York Model,” a conceptual paradigm for the treatment of persons with co-occurring disorders. Dr. McCorry also oversees the development of new initiatives that respond to emerging issues like improving patient outcomes through the adoption of evidence-based interventions. He is the Principal Investigator on the National Institute on Drug Abuse State Infrastructure Grant to enhance the state’s capacity to foster the adoption of evidence-based practices, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant to improve access and retention through the use process improvement approaches. Dr. McCorry is Chairperson of the Washington Circle Group, a SAMHSA-sponsored initiative to develop substance abuse performance measures for use in managed care and public sector settings. He is co-Chair of the National Quality Forum’s Evidence-based Practices to Treat Substance Use Disorders Steering Committee. He is a member of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s National Advisory Council. He also serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Substance Treatment and the External Advisory Board of the Brandeis/Harvard Center on Managed Care. Dr. McCorry has worked in the field of substance abuse prevention and treatment for over 30 years. He received his doctorate in Counseling and Human Services from St. John’s University in 1982.


Kay Miller is a Senior Research Leader at Thomson Healthcare in Santa Barbara with more than 26 years of experience with federal and state healthcare data. Her primary focus is working with administrative healthcare data as a project manager, programmer, analyst, and database designer. Through her participation on projects for SAMHSA, CMS, state Medicaid agencies, and related agencies, she has gained extensive knowledge of a wide variety databases. She has used this knowledge to assist in the development and testing of Washington Circle measures, both in the private sector and within state substance abuse agency systems. In addition, Ms. Miller has assisted in the creation of reports and analytic tables around such topics as psychotropic medication, cost and utilization of MH/SA services, children’s mental health, parity, and data integration and interoperability. She has provided technical assistance to states on data issues, including the design and implementation of integrated MH/SA and Medicaid data for reporting purposes. She was also instrumental in assisting CMS in the 1999 redesign of their Medicaid Statistical Information System. She offers an in-depth knowledge of healthcare data, ranging from claims and eligibility data systems to diagnosis and procedure coding systems.
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Mark A. Reynolds, Ed.D.  received his doctorate in education from Oklahoma State University. He has worked for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for sixteen years in the Evaluation and Data Analysis section, and currently serves as the Data Projects Coordinator. Dr. Reynolds is responsible for the supervision, management and coordination of data projects such as federal grant activities, data analyses, and program evaluations.  He participated in the workgroup charged with designing and implementing the statewide, web-based data reporting system for mental health, substance abuse and domestic violence services, and has developed and maintains websites for several organizations, including the CMHS Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program website. Dr. Reynolds oversees the CSAT Treatment Episode Data project, the Department’s Joint Commission performance indicator reporting, and a statewide consumer satisfaction survey project.
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